Personnel

Faculty

Grace Saba

Assistant Professor
Center for Ocean Observing Leadership
Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences
School of Environmental and Biological Sciences

848-932-3466
71 Dudley Rd,
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
Room 316
Full CV
Two Page CV

Grace Saba
I initiate diverse, multidisciplinary projects in order to address both small-scale (individual organism) and large-scale (whole ecosystem) questions with ecological, physiological, and biogeochemical implications. My broad research interests are in the fields of coastal marine organismal ecology and physiology, with emphasis on how organisms interact with their environment (physical-biological coupling) and other organisms (food web dynamics and predator-prey interactions), how physiological processes impact biogeochemistry (nutrient cycling and carbon sequestration), and how climate change (i.e., ocean acidification, warming) impacts these processes. I apply multiple techniques and collaborate with physical/biological/chemical oceanographers and physiologists, molecular ecologists, fisheries scientists, ocean observers, and climate modelers. I employ an integrative, mechanistic approach and have strong laboratory and field components in my research.

Graduate Students

Emily Slesinger

Graduate Student
Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences

71 Dudley Rd,
New Brunswick, NJ 08901

Emily Slesinger
I graduated from the University of California Santa Cruz in June 2015 with a B.S. in Marine Biology and a B.A. in Environmental Studies. Combined with my love for the ocean and passion to protect the environment, I want to focus my research interests on helping provide valuable research to better manage the populations of commercially important species. Currently, I am studying the physiological performance of black sea bass by measuring their aerobic scope under different temperatures based on climate change projection models. This project will likely become one chapter of my dissertation as well as a starting platform for more research questions and projects.

Elizabeth Wright-Fairbanks

Graduate Student
Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences

71 Dudley Rd,
New Brunswick, NJ 08901

Emily Slesinger
Broadly, my research interests are the biological effects of climate change. I am interested in ascertaining how the many facets of climate change may alter population dynamics and the physiology of marine organisms. Currently, I am using Slocum Gliders to investigate pH on the east coast of the United States. I hope to use this data to better inform ocean acidification models and relate my findings to local fishery stock assessments.

Undergraduate Students

Brandon Grosso

Undergraduate Student
Marine Biology
Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences

Brandon Grosso
I am currently pursing a degree in Marine Biology and attempting a second degree in Computer Science. Broadly, my interests for research are examining marine life behavior and physiology and how organisms are impacted by climate/ocean change. Previously, I've conducted MatLab analyses to determine how environmental parameters are related to catch number and seasonal migrations for black sea bass over the last 30 years in the Mid-Atlantic. Through my work with Slocum Gliders, I have gained understanding in glider software, hardware, and data analysis. I am also currently training to become a AAUS Scientific Diver. In the future, I wish to use all of these skills to better understand the ocean and help protect it.

Laura Wiltsee

Undergraduate Student
Marine Biology
Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences

Laura Wiltsee
I am an undergraduate student majoring in Biological Oceanography with a minor in Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources. I am inspired by the unknown world that is our ocean and my research interests center around the biological impacts of climate change on aquatic ecosystems. Currently, I am implementing the use of a pH sensor on an underwater glider to measure pH levels along the Mid-Atlantic Bight. This data will help to shed light on the effects of increased carbon dioxide on this very valuable ecosystem.

Kasey Walsh

Undergraduate Student
Marine Biology
Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences

Kasey Walsh
I am currently pursuing an undergraduate degree in Biological Oceanography. I am involved in a microplastics project to determine the concentration of plastic consumed by zooplankton in the Raritan Bay. In the future I'd like to explore the effects of microplastic ingestion on various organisms. I am also involved in scientific outreach programs to help other college students understand the importance of research in marine science.

Previous Post-Doctoral Research Associates

  • Corie Charpentier, 2017-2018

Previous Undergraduate Students

  • Rachel Young, Rutgers
  • Catherine Powell, Rutgers
  • Bekah Lane, Emporia State University
  • Gabrielle Quadrado, Federal University of Rio Grande (Brazil)
  • Monisha Sugla, Rutgers
  • Oliver Ho, Rutgers
  • Ryan Fantasia, Rutgers
  • Grace Coogan, Occidental College
  • Emily Pirl, Rutgers
  • Amelia Snow, Rutgers
  • Miram Gleiber, Virginia Institute of Marine Science
  • Lori Garzio, Virginia Institute of Marine Science