Zooplankton Ecology and Physiology

Zooplankton Ecology and Physiology

Antarctic krill (Euphausia suberba): a vital food source for penguins, flighted sea birds, fish, and baleen whales in the West Antarctic Peninsula Region. Photo by Chris Linder.
Zooplankton Ecology and Physiology
Zooplankton Ecology and Physiology
Fish Physiology

Fish Physiology

Respiration rates are measured in Atlantic Butterfish (Peprilus triacanthus) via intermittent respirometry in swim tunnels. Photo by Grace Saba.
Fish Physiology
Fish Physiology
Physical-Biological Coupling

Physical-Biological Coupling

Generalized illustration summarizing how winter and spring climate, weather, and physical oceanographic processes, driven in part by phases of the Southern Annular Mode (SAM), cascade from phytoplankton to krill recruitment in the West Antarctic Peninsula region. From Saba et al. 2014, Nature Communications, 5: 4318,
 doi: 10.1038/ncomms5318.
Physical-Biological Coupling
Physical-Biological Coupling
Biogeochemical Cycling

Biogeochemical Cycling

Fecal pellets produced by Northern anchovy in the Santa Barbara Channel that sink rapidly from the surface ocean to depth. Photo by Grace Saba.
Biogeochemical Cycling
Biogeochemical Cycling
Climate Change: Ocean Acidification and Warming

Climate Change: Ocean Acidification and Warming

Microcosms to determine the impacts of elevated carbon dioxide on plankton composition are incubated aboard the R/V Laurence M. Gould near the West Antarctic Peninsula. Photo by Grace Saba
Climate Change: Ocean Acidification and Warming
Climate Change: Ocean Acidification and Warming

The Saba Lab conducts research using an interdisciplinary approach to solve ecologically important, complex problems. We challenge ourselves to initiate diverse, multidisciplinary projects in order to address both small-scale (individual organism) and large-scale (whole ecosystem) questions with ecological, physiological, and biogeochemical implications. Our broad research interests are in the fields of coastal marine organismal ecology and physiology, with emphasis on how organisms interact with their environment (physical-biological coupling) and other organisms (food web dynamics and predator-prey interactions), how physiological processes impact biogeochemistry (nutrient cycling and carbon sequestration), and how climate change (i.e., ocean acidification, warming) impacts these processes. We apply multiple techniques and collaborate with physical/biological/chemical oceanographers and physiologists, molecular ecologists, fisheries scientists, ocean observers, and climate modelers. We employ an integrative, mechanistic approach and have strong laboratory and field components in our research. We work as local as the shelf waters of the Mid Atlantic Bight to remote regions in Antarctica.