Semester availability Current Course Schedule
Fall 

11:628:100 OCEANOGRAPHY HOUSE (1.5 cr) site
Prerequisites: None
This first-year seminar introduces students to the application of technologies used in ocean observing systems. Students work in small groups mentored by undergraduates with prior observing system experience and participate in ongoing research and development.  

Fall (SEBS/SAS core)  

11:628:120 INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY (3 cr)* syllabus
Prerequisites: None
This course will enhance ‘ocean literacy’ among students with diverse backgrounds by introducing and acquainting you with essential aspects of oceanography. Because of oceanography’s interdisciplinary nature, we will examine geological, physical, chemical, and biological processes as they apply to the ocean. With this foundation, you will comprehend a variety of oceanographic terms and concepts, including: how ocean systems work, how they are studied, how the ocean influences Earth's biosphere and atmosphere, how the oceans support living ecosystems, and which issues concern the fate of oceans and their coastlines.

* This course meets the Core Curriculum requirement for Natural Sciences [NS]. On completion, students will be able to understand and apply basic principles and concepts in the physical or biological sciences, and also to explain and be able to assess the relationship among assumptions, method, evidence, arguments, and theory in scientific analysis.  

Fall 

11:628:125 EXPLORING AND UNDERSTANDING THE WORLD’S OCEANS (3 cr) syllabus
Prerequisites: None
This is an online course that will provide an exploration of the world's oceans. The course will explore the geology, chemistry and biology in the world's oceans and include a strong focus on how this impacts human society. We will study the fundamental science but through an emphasis on the human stories of exploration. This will provide understand of how the ocean operates and highlight the potential impacts on human society which increasingly rely on the ocean for food, commerce, and natural resources.  

Fall 

11:628:2__ TOPICS: MARINE SCIENCES (1.5 cr) site 
Prerequisites: None
This course is taught by faculty in the Center for Ocean Observation Leadership. Specific topics depend on ongoing research on expanding and applying ocean observation technologies, and in the past have included flying an autonomous underwater vehicle (RU27) across the Atlantic for the first time. The class meets weekly for an 80-minute period and, in addition, students participate in weekly 60-minute out-of-class group meetings. Each group presents their work to the class at the end of the semester. These classes may be counted toward the Marine Sciences major or minor elective requirements, or to fulfill the hands-on research experience required for the major.  

Fall (SEBS/SAS core)  

11:628:221 HUMAN INTERACTIONS WITH COASTAL OCEAN (3 cr)* syllabus
Prerequisites: None
This course is designed to identify the ways that scientific knowledge can be used to resolve environmental problems. The contemporary problem of loss of marine resources and difficulties of restoring and conserving them is placed in a human and environmental context to obtain a broad perspective on the application of science to societal goals. Topics will be multidisciplinary to document the complexity of environmental problems and their potential solutions. Topics will be related to effects of global climate change, pollution, loss of natural environments, management of threatened and endangered species, extraction of living and non-living resources, and mitigation of natural hazards.

* This course meets the Core Curriculum requirement for Natural Sciences [NS]. On completion, students will be able to understand and apply basic principles and concepts in the physical or biological sciences, and also to identify and critically assess ethical and societal issues in science. This course also meets the Core Curriculum requirement for 21st Century Challenges [21C]. On completion, students will be able to analyze a contemporary global issue from a multidisciplinary perspective.  

Fall (odd years)  

11:628:321 ICHTHYOLOGY (4 cr) syllabus 
Prerequisites: 01:119:115-116
This course will include field trips, lectures and labs. The lectures will be based primarily, but not exclusively, on the text and the field experiences. Laboratory exercises will center on the identification and anatomy of New Jersey marine and estuarine fishes. The field trips will take place in the Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve at Mullica River - Great Bay and we will work from the Rutgers University Marine Field Station (outside of Tuckerton in southern Ocean County). (For more information on the Field Station, see our website at http://marine.rutgers.edu/rumfs/. These trips will focus on collecting techniques in a variety of shallow water habitats, identification of fishes based on field characters, and impromptu lectures.

Fall (even years)  

11:628:309 FISHERY SCIENCE (3 cr) syllabus
Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Requires some familiarity with algebra and a willingness to engage in basic mathematical modeling. General biology highly recommended and a course in ecology preferred.
This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of wild capture fisheries. We will cover marine and freshwater fisheries and commercial and recreational fisheries; aquaculture will not be covered in detail. As complex social-ecological systems, fisheries can only be understood through the combined use of theories and techniques from biology, ecology, oceanography, mathematics, statistics, economics and other social sciences. We will examine the behavior of fish populations, fishers, and management institutions as well as the emergent properties of the entire system.  

Fall 

11:628:320 DYNAMICS OF MARINE ECOSYSTEMS (4 cr) syllabus
Prerequisites: One term of calculus AND (two terms of general biology OR two terms of general chemistry OR two terms of general physics)
An overview of the fundamental processes in the marine environment with emphasis on interdisciplinary linkages in the functioning of marine ecosystems. Understanding the dynamics in the physics, chemistry, and biology of the oceans will be emphasized.  

Fall

11:628:363 OCEANOGRAPHIC METHODS AND DATA ANALYSIS: BIOLOGY/CHEMISTRY (3 cr) syllabus
Prerequisites: 11:628:320; Rutgers REHS Laboratory Safety Training
Course focuses on basic techniques to collect, analyze, and report oceanographic and marine science data with emphasis on biological and chemical variables. This will include interactive lectures, team-based hands-on field sampling, laboratory sample analysis, writing and presenting results, and writing a scientific paper. Teamwork is required for this course. This course will require some travel as well as work outdoors, aboard research vessels, and in the laboratory with chemicals.

Fall (odd years)  

11:628:405 MOLECULAR OCEANOGRAPHY (3 cr) syllabus
Prerequisites: 01:119:116 AND (11:628:320 OR 11:216:351)
The oceans represent the oldest, evolving continuum on Earth with its evolutionary heritage being imprinted in the genes of resident microbes. Microorganisms (i.e., phytoplankton, bacteria, viruses) account for >90% of all oceanic biomass and drive oceanic biogeochemical cycles. Still, we are faced with fundamental open questions about the activity, molecular diversity, and evolutionary development of their biochemical and molecular strategies. This is largely due to the fact that microbes are hard to differentiate and study using traditional, ecological observational techniques. This course will highlight emerging efforts to elucidate the activity, diversity, and evolution of microbial genes and link them to key oceanic ecosystem and biogeochemical processes, by merging biochemistry, molecular biology, and genome-based approaches with innovative instrumentation. These efforts have begun to shed novel insight into staggering microbial biodiversity and a range of cellular strategies, including niche adaptation, stress response, cell communication, signaling, and defense, which strongly shape their ecological impact in the oceans.  

Fall 

11:628:476 HISTORY OF THE EARTH SYSTEM (3 cr) syllabus
Prerequisites: Introductory courses in Chemistry, Biology, and Physics (or by permission).
This course integrates atmospheric, oceanographic, geological and biological concepts in an historical perspective to introduce the student to the major processes that have shaped Earth's environment. The course will examine climatic processes on geological time scales, the evolution of organisms, the cycling of elements, and the feedbacks between these processes.  

Fall 

11:628:451 PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY (4 cr) syllabus
Prerequisites: Two terms of calculus
This course is designed to introduce students to the important physical processes in the oceans in such a way that they will understand both the conceptual physical principles and at the larger scale how these fit into the earth as a system. The initial focus is to develop the basic equations which describe the principles upon which physical oceanography is based. These principles are then used to help understand waves, tides, currents, and the large-scale ocean circulation. Homework problems are assigned to reinforce the concepts learned in class. Throughout the course, examples will be given to show how physical oceanography affects and is affected by the biological, chemical, and geological processes in the ocean.  

Fall

11:628:461 THE BIOLOGY OF LIVING IN THE OCEAN: WATER COLUMN ECOSYSTEMS & PROCESSES (3 cr) syllabus
prerequisites: 11:628:320, 1 term Calculus, 2 terms General Biology; Recommended: General Chemistry and Physics
The ocean is the majority of Earth and the largest biome on the planet. Processes that occur in the water column are highly dynamic and central to regulating the planet’s biogeochemistry which influences how much oxygen we breath, how many fish exist, and how much oil is available to human’s to extract. This course will cover the processes that regulate the biology of the plankton and fish, which drives the community ecology for ocean ecosystems. This course covers ecological themes such as the acquisition and transformation of energy and materials, population regulation, competition/predation dynamics, population connectivity and marine food webs. The course will also highlight approaches and technologies used to make measurements in the ocea

Fall 

11:628:497 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN MARINE AND COASTAL SCIENCES (credits by arrangement)
Research projects under the guidance of faculty members.  

Winter (even years)  

11:628:317 AQUACULTURE (3 cr) syllabus
Prerequisites: A solid background in the basic science. Special permission number required to register.
This course stresses the role of science in aquaculture. Lectures cover aquaculture production methods, fish and shellfish growth and reproduction, nutrition, genetics, disease control, economics, environmental consequences of aquaculture and public policy issues. Laboratory exercises involve experimental and observational studies of molluscan and fish larvae and adults, and techniques used for water chemistry and disease-diagnostics. Field trips to aquaculture sites and facilities, student-led discussions of research papers, and video or slide presentations of individual cultured species complete the course. Lectures, discussion sessions, and laboratory exercises occupy the entire day, every day. Class meets daily from 8 am to 5 pm for the entire period at the Haskin Shellfish Research Laboratory in Bivalve, New Jersey - about 120 miles south of New Brunswick on Delaware Bay. A fee of $175 will be charged to cover dormitory cost. 

Winter 

11:628:340 IDENTIFICATION OF MARINE INVERTEBRATES (2 cr) syllabus
Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Preference given to students who have taken 11:216:324 (Invertebrate Zoology) or its equivalent.
This is an intensive, one-week intersession class which is taught at Rutgers’ Jacques Cousteau Coastal Education Center on the coast in Tuckerton, NJ. Students will become familiar with the major phyla of marine invertebrates and learn the principles of taxonomic classification and identification to the species level. The course includes a field trip to collect benthic and planktonic samples, and a visit to the Rutgers University Marine Field Station. Live samples will be taken and the students will use dissecting and compound microscopes to assist with identifications. Preserved specimens will also be used for groups not readily available. Although there will be daily lectures, the course consists primarily of hands-on laboratory work.  

Spring (SEBS/SAS core)  

11:628:120 INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY (3 cr)* syllabus
Prerequisites: None
This course will enhance ‘ocean literacy’ among students with diverse backgrounds by introducing and acquainting you with essential aspects of oceanography. Because of oceanography’s interdisciplinary nature, we will examine geological, physical, chemical, and biological processes as they apply to the ocean. With this foundation, you will comprehend a variety of oceanographic terms and concepts, including: how ocean systems work, how they are studied, how the ocean influences Earth's biosphere and atmosphere, how the oceans support living ecosystems, and which issues concern the fate of oceans and their coastlines.

* This course meets the Core Curriculum requirement for Natural Sciences [NS]. On completion, students will be able to understand and apply basic principles and concepts in the physical or biological sciences, and also to explain and be able to assess the relationship among assumptions, method, evidence, arguments, and theory in scientific analysis.  

Fall 

11:628:2__ TOPICS: MARINE SCIENCES (1.5 cr) site
Prerequisites: None
This course is taught by faculty in the Center for Ocean Observation Leadership. Specific topics depend on ongoing research on expanding and applying ocean observation technologies, and in the past have included flying an autonomous underwater vehicle (RU27) across the Atlantic for the first time. The class meets weekly for an 80-minute period and, in addition, students participate in weekly 60-minute out-of-class group meetings. Each group presents their work to the class at the end of the semester. These classes may be counted toward the Marine Sciences major or minor elective requirements, or to fulfill the hands-on research experience required for the major.  

Spring (even years) 

11:628:204 THE WATER PLANET (3 cr) syllabus
Prerequisites: None
Survey of the science, environmental impact, and resource allocation of water on the Earth. Characteristics of water: hydrologic cycle; runoff and erosion; river systems; past and present climates; water quality; political and economic aspects of water.  

Spring

11:628:306 TPCS: Scientific Diving (3) Syllabus
Prerequisites: Water skills: Ability to swim 400 yards/meters without swim aid, Ability to tread water for 10 minute, Medical clearance for scuba diving. Students who are not certified divers will complete the academics & confined water skill requirements for PADI Open Water Diver, Advanced Open Water Diver and Rescue Diver. Open water certification dives are not included in the course, opportunity to complete open water dives will be offered June- October.
This course is an introductory course designed to provide the student with the academics, practical skill applications, and SCUBA training to meet and exceed the American Academy of Underwater Science’s (AAUS) minimum standards for Scientific Diving certification.
The course will provide the student with training in open water, advanced open water and rescue diver skills. Knowledge development and skill will include dive theory, equipment, dive planning, dive safety, oxygen administration, CPR/First Aid, mixed gas (Nitrox), and scientific diving methodology. These core elements will cover the academic and practical skills application in confined water (pool) environment. Training materials developed by the AAUS, PADI & DAN will be used for the academic component of the program.
Students will be required to demonstrate proficiency in both their knowledge of course materials with quizzes, mid-term exam & final exam, in-water safety, emergency procedures, and scientific diving methods. In addition, the student will be required to prepare a 3-4 page paper for oral presentation to the class and instructional staff. The paper and presentation will be an independently researched paper expanding upon course subject matter, dive equipment, diving modes, or science diving methods and techniques.

Spring 

11:628:364 OCEANOGRAPHIC METHODS AND DATA ANALYSIS: PHYSICAL PROCESSES (3 cr) syllabus
Prerequisites: 11:628:320
This course focuses on basic techniques to collect, analyze, and report oceanographic and marine science data. This will include interactive lectures, team-based hands-on field sampling, writing reports, presenting results, and writing a scientific paper. Teamwork is required for this course. This course will require some travel, work outdoors, and work aboard research vessels.  

Spring 

11:628:401 SCIENCE IN SHORELINE MANAGEMENT (3 cr) syllabus
Prerequisites: Restricted to juniors and seniors. Students who have taken any earth science, bioscience or environmental science course will have sufficient background preparation.
This research-oriented course will be of interest to students in geography, geology, ecology, and coastal sciences and in disciplines related to environmental management. Course material includes identification and discussion of the processes associated with conversion of shores by direct and indirect human actions and the resulting appearance, evolution and function of the coastal landscape. This information is then used to provide a basis for environmental debate and an approach to management of endangered living and non-living resources. Case studies are used to illustrate coastal management practices and the scientific, technical, and social constraints to the application of science to policy formulation. The focus of the course material is on beaches and dunes because human alterations to these features and the natural processes that shape them are so prevalent and visible in the coastal zone.  

Spring 

11:628:410 BIOPHYSICAL INTERACTIONS: FROM BARNACLES TO JELLYFISH (3 cr) syllabus
Prerequisites: Two terms of calculus and 11:628:320
This course emphasizes understanding how organisms interact with and are affected by their physical fluid environment. The aim is to introduce fundamental principles of major topics, including life at low Reynolds numbers, benthic boundary layers, biomechanics, and diffusion and dispersal. We will discuss physical processes and their impacts on the ecology of algae, zooplankton, fish, jellyfish, and benthic invertebrates. Many principles we cover will also be relevant for microbes, terrestrial plants and animals, and chemical tracers. Specific topics may vary depending on students’ interests.  

Spring (odd years) 

11:628:452 GEOPHYSICAL DATA ANALYSIS (3 cr) syllabus
Prerequisites: 01:640:244 OR 01:640:252
Analysis of equally and unequally spaced data; filters; FFT; spectra; linear systems theory; empirical orthogonal functions; harmonic analysis; grid interpolation techniques; emphasis on applied data analysis.  

Spring 

11:628:462 THE BIOLOGY OF LIVING IN THE OCEAN: BOUNDARY ECOSYSTEMS AND PROCESSES (3 credits) syllabus
Prerequisites: One term of calculus, 01:119:115-116, 11:628:320

This course covers the processes that regulate the biology, productivity, and population and community dynamics at the boundaries of the ocean, including intertidal zones, estuaries, salt marshes, coral reefs, hydrothermal vents, and the sea floor. The boundaries harbor charismatic ecosystems and the distinctive spatial structures provided by the boundaries shape the way in which these ecosystems function. The course will cover critical ecological themes such as the acquisition and transformation of energy and materials, population regulation, competition/predation dynamics, population connectivity, food webs, succession, and spatial structure.

Spring 

11:628:472 CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY (3 cr) syllabus
Prerequisites: 01:160:162
The goal of this course is to teach students how to apply basic chemical concepts to understand the biogeochemical cycles and distributions of chemical constituents in the ocean. The course will cover major geochemical cycles including the major nutrients, the carbon/carbonate system and sedimentary diagenesis and focus on the interdisciplinary nature of modern problems in chemical oceanography. The use of chemical constituents as tracers for understanding biochemical cycles and their use in paleo reconstructions of ocean processes will also be covered. Interactive problem solving will be emphasized in assignments so that students gain experience using chemical data to understand the processes governing marine systems. Current research problems in chemical oceanography will be brought in though reading of the scientific literature for the preparation of the term paper.  

Spring 

11:628:498 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN MARINE AND COASTAL SCIENCES (credits by arrangement)
Research projects under the guidance of faculty members.  

Spring 

11:628:303 OCEAN SCIENCE INQUIRY (3 cr) syllabus
Prerequisites: 1 semester of General Biology OR 1 semester of General Chemistry OR Introduction to Environmental Science OR Introduction to Oceanography (or permission of instructor).
The goal of this course is to familiarize undergraduate students with different topical and emerging issues facing the oceans. The course, lead by graduate students and post-doctoral researchers along with a faculty advisor, will touch on key principles in oceanography and environmental sciences and equip students with a deeper understanding of the science behind a number of "hot topics" in marine science prevalent in media coverage. Through a combination of weekly lectures, group discussions and exercises, which draw from the primary literature, this course further aims to enhance critical thinking, the integration of science principles, and science communication. Current topical areas include climate change impacts, sea-level rise, hurricanes, threats to coastal habitats, ocean resources, and emerging ocean technologies.