Outreach

Co-Coordinator of the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Acidification Network (MACAN)

NOAACOCAoutreach

Grace Saba serves as a co-coordinator of MACAN (http://www.midacan.org/), one of many regional acidification networks across the United States. MACAN is coordinated by the Mid-Atlantic Regional Association Coastal Ocean Observing System (MARACOOS) and the Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean (MARCO). MACAN seeks to answer basic questions about the intensity, frequency, and location of acidification events. MACAN seeks to understand the causes of those events, whether from atmospheric sources of carbon, land based pollution, or something else. MACAN also works to educate managers, elected officials, industry representatives, and the public about solutions to reduce those sources of acidification. MACAN can be a starting point to work together towards data driven answers to tough acidification questions.

NOAA Coastal and Ocean Climate Applications (COCA)

NOAACOCAoutreach

Grace and Vincent Saba, graduate student Emily Slesinger (shown in photo), and undergraduate student Rachael Young presented their research at the NOAA Sandy Hook Science Days

Project PARKA (Planting AntaRctica in KAnsas)

outreach

Project PARKA (Planting AntaRctica in KAnsas): http://coseenow.net/project-parka/. Participating high school teachers and students in 19 different high schools in Kansas worked with me to learn about interdisciplinary oceanographic research taking place at the West Antarctic Peninsula. This exciting research mission worked to characterize the connection between ocean chemistry, climate change, and Antarctic food webs. During the 2013-14 academic year, students learned the research mission science through participating in classroom lessons, following mission blogs, talking with scientists at Palmer Station, Antarctica, through Live Video Broadcasts, meeting the research scientists, and presenting their own research at a spring Student Research Symposium. Teachers participated in a summer workshop in July 2013 to learn about the science and project.

 

Open Positions

I aim to actively support a diverse research program that involves undergraduate and graduate students, post-doctoral research associates, and technicians interested in coastal ecology, organismal physiology, biogeochemistry, ocean observing, and climate change. I also invest time conducting outreach to educate the community about my research and expect students and post-docs to be involved in these activities. If you are interested in joining my lab, please contact me.

 

Undergraduate Students

I typically recruit 1-2 undergraduate students per semester to assist in field and laboratory research. I encourage our undergraduates to fully engage in the research process by developing their own research projects and to complete a senior honors thesis. I often accept Aresty and RIOS summer students in the lab. I am currently looking to fill 3 undergraduate hourly positions! Please see this advertisement. Applications are due October 6, 2017.

Graduate Students

Please email me if you are considering applying for a Rutgers graduate assistantship in Oceanography (https://marine.rutgers.edu/main/academics/graduate) or to explore other fellowship and joint funding opportunities.

Postdoctoral Researchers

Please email me if you are considering applying for a Rutgers EOAS postdoctoral fellowship or to explore other fellowship and joint funding opportunities.

Schofield, O., Saba, G.K., Coleman, K., Carvalho, A.F., Couto, N., Ducklow, H., Finkel, Z., Irwin, A., Kahl, A., Miles, T., Montes-Hugo, M., Stammerjohn, S., Waite, N. 2017. Decadal variability in coastal phytoplankton community composition in a changing West Antarctic Peninsula. Deep-Sea Research I 124: 42-54.

Fountain, A.G., Saba, G.K., Adams, B., Doran, P., Fraser, W., Gooseff, M., Obryk, M., Priscu, J.C., Stammerjohn, S., Virginia, R.. 2016. The impact of a large-scale climate event on Antarctic ecosystem processes. Bioscience 66(10): 848-863.

Gutt, J., Constable, A., Cummings, V., Hosie, G., McIntyre, T., Mintenbeck, K., Murray, A., Peck, L.S., Ropert-Coudert, Y., Saba, G., Schofield, O., Schloss, I., Stefels, J., Takahashi, K. 2016. Vulnerability of Southern Ocean biota to climate change. Antarctic Environments Portal, http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/513335/.

Schofield, O., Jones, C., Kohut, J., Kremer, U., Miles, T.N., Saba, G.K., Webb, D., Glenn. 2015, S. Developing Coordinated Communities of Autonomous Gliders for Sampling Coastal Ecosystems. Marine Technology Society Journal 49(3): 9-16.

Saba, G.K., Fraser, W.R., Saba, V.S., Iannuzzi, R.A., Coleman, K.E., Doney, S.C., Ducklow, H.W., Martinson, D.G., Miles, T.N., Patterson-Fraser, D.L., Stammerjohn, S.E., Steinberg, D.K., and Schofield, O. 2014. Winter and Spring Controls on the Summer Food Web of the coastal West Antarctic Peninsula. Nature Communications, 5: 4318,
 doi: 10.1038/ncomms5318.

Schofield, O., Kohut, J., Saba, G., Yi, X., Wilkin, J., and S. Glenn. Ocean observing and prediction. 2014. In: Y.Q. Wang, Ed., Encyclopedia of Natural Resources. Taylor Francis, New York, NY. doi:10.1018/E-ENRW-120048087.

Schofield, O., Ducklow, H., Bernard, K., Doney, S., Patterson-Fraser, D., Gorman, K., Martinson, D., Meredith, M., Saba, G., Stammerjohn, S., Steinberg, D., and W. Fraser. 2013. Penguin biogeography along the West Antarctic Peninsula. Oceanography 26: 78-80.

Saba, G.K., and D.K. Steinberg. 2012. Abundance, composition, and sinking rates of fish fecal pellets in the Santa Barbara Channel. Scientific Reports 2: doi:10.1038/srep00716.

Saba, G.K., Schofield, O., Torres, J.J., Ombres, E.H., and D.K. Steinberg. 2012. Increased feeding and nutrient excretion of adult Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba, exposed to enhanced carbon dioxide (CO2). PLoS ONE: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0052224.

Schofield, O., Roarty, H., Saba, G., Xu, Y., Kohut, J., Glenn, S., Manderson, J., and M. Oliver. 2012. Phytoplankton dynamics and bottom water oxygen during a large bloom in the summer of 2011. Oceans, 2012 , doi: 10.1109/OCEANS.2012.6405078.

Saba, G.K., Steinberg, D.K., and D.A. Bronk. 2011. The relative importance of sloppy feeding, excretion, and fecal pellet leaching in the release of dissolved carbon and nitrogen by Acartia tonsa copepods. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 404: 47-56.

Saba, G.K., Steinberg, D.K., Bronk, D.A., and A.R. Place. 2011. The effects of harmful algal species and food concentration on zooplankton grazer production of dissolved organic matter and inorganic nutrients. Harmful Algae 10: 291-303.

Saba, G.K., Steinberg, D.K., and D.A. Bronk. 2009. Effects of diet on release of dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients by the copepod Acartia tonsa. Marine Ecology Progress Series 386: 147-161.

Steinberg, D.K. and G.K. Saba. 2008. Nitrogen consumption and metabolism in marine zooplankton. In: Capone, D.G., Bronk, D.A., Mulholland, M.R., and E.J. Carpenter, eds., Nitrogen in the Marine Environment, 2nd Edition. Academic Press, Boston. p 1135-1196.

Goldthwait, S.A., Carlson, C.A., Henderson, G.K., and A.L. Alldredge. 2005. Effects of physical fragmentation on remineralization of marine snow. Marine Ecology Progress Series 305: 59-65.

Personnel

Faculty

Grace Saba

Assistant Professor
Center for Ocean Observing Leadership
Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences
School of Environmental and Biological Sciences

848-932-3466
71 Dudley Rd,
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
Room 316
Full CV
Two Page CV

Grace Saba
I initiate diverse, multidisciplinary projects in order to address both small-scale (individual organism) and large-scale (whole ecosystem) questions with ecological, physiological, and biogeochemical implications. My broad research interests are in the fields of coastal marine organismal ecology and physiology, with emphasis on how organisms interact with their environment (physical-biological coupling) and other organisms (food web dynamics and predator-prey interactions), how physiological processes impact biogeochemistry (nutrient cycling and carbon sequestration), and how climate change (i.e., ocean acidification, warming) impacts these processes. I apply multiple techniques and collaborate with physical/biological/chemical oceanographers and physiologists, molecular ecologists, fisheries scientists, ocean observers, and climate modelers. I employ an integrative, mechanistic approach and have strong laboratory and field components in my research.

Graduate Students

Emily Slesinger

Graduate Student
Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences

71 Dudley Rd,
New Brunswick, NJ 08901

Emily Slesinger
I graduated from the University of California Santa Cruz in June 2015 with a B.S. in Marine Biology and a B.A. in Environmental Studies. Combined with my love for the ocean and passion to protect the environment, I want to focus my research interests on helping provide valuable research to better manage the populations of commercially important species. Currently, I am studying the physiological performance of black sea bass by measuring their aerobic scope under different temperatures based on climate change projection models. This project will likely become one chapter of my dissertation as well as a starting platform for more research questions and projects.

Elizabeth Wright-Fairbanks

Graduate Student
Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences

71 Dudley Rd,
New Brunswick, NJ 08901

Emily Slesinger
Broadly, my research interests are the biological effects of climate change. I am interested in ascertaining how the many facets of climate change may alter population dynamics and the physiology of marine organisms. Currently, I am using Slocum Gliders to investigate pH on the east coast of the United States. I hope to use this data to better inform ocean acidification models and relate my findings to local fishery stock assessments.

Undergraduate Students

Rachael Young

Undergraduate Student
Marine Biology
Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences

Rachel Young
Currently as an undergraduate I am pursuing a degree in Marine Biology. Underlying my research ambitions are learning and connecting new information, applying the information to serve and protect the environment, and educating and inspiring people about our oceans. Specifically, my research interests are in biogeochemical cycles, food webs, fish physiology and how they interact with climate change. Previously, I’ve done research in biogeochemical cycling and the effects of colored dissolved organic matter on the optical properties of the water and phytoplankton community composition. After completing a doctorate in marine science, my main goal is to perform public or academic research in a marine science lab where the analyzed data will aid in future predictions about our oceans and protect the ecosystem. 

Brandon Grosso

Undergraduate Student
Marine Biology
Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences

Brandon Grosso
I am currently pursing a degree in Marine Biology and attempting a second degree in Computer Science. Broadly, my interests for research are examining marine life behavior and physiology and how organisms are impacted by climate/ocean change. Previously, I've conducted MatLab analyses to determine how environmental parameters are related to catch number and seasonal migrations for black sea bass over the last 30 years in the Mid-Atlantic. Through my work with Slocum Gliders, I have gained understanding in glider software, hardware, and data analysis. I am also currently training to become a AAUS Scientific Diver. In the future, I wish to use all of these skills to better understand the ocean and help protect it.

Catherine Powell

Undergraduate Student
Marine Biology
Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences

Catherine Powell
I am pursuing a major in Directed Marine Studies and a minor is Environmental Policy, Institutions, and Behavior. The marriage of both of these fields is where my interests lay. Human impact on our planet and how it fuels climate change is what I would like to study in depth, especially relating to problems that result in coastal and marine ecosystems. I understand and value that policy and regulation is how we can reap the benefits of being informed on a subject scientifically, and is how we apply such knowledge on a large scale. I plan to support the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Acidification Network (MACAN; www.MidACAN.org) to conduct public outreach and educate a diverse collective of people on ocean acidification, while also getting a better grasp on its effects. I also work in a 15,000 gallon aquaponics facility, which allows me to see results of different chemical levels in the water and how it affects the sustainable system of koi fish and various plants. I enjoy sharing these observations with our buyers, along with explaining the opportunity of environmental consideration regarding something of the utmost importance such as food.

Laura Wiltsee

Undergraduate Student
Marine Biology
Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences

Laura Wiltsee
I am an undergraduate student majoring in Biological Oceanography with a minor in Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources. I am inspired by the unknown world that is our ocean and my research interests center around the biological impacts of climate change on aquatic ecosystems. Currently, I am implementing the use of a pH sensor on an underwater glider to measure pH levels along the Mid-Atlantic Bight. This data will help to shed light on the effects of increased carbon dioxide on this very valuable ecosystem.

Previous Undergraduate Students

  • Bekah Lane, Emporia State University
  • Gabrielle Quadrado, Federal University of Rio Grande (Brazil)
  • Monisha Sugla, Rutgers
  • Oliver Ho, Rutgers
  • Ryan Fantasia, Rutgers
  • Grace Coogan, Occidental College
  • Emily Pirl, Rutgers
  • Amelia Snow, Rutgers
  • Miram Gleiber, Virginia Institute of Marine Science
  • Lori Garzio, Virginia Institute of Marine Science

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