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Still wrapping up!

We got into port right on time on Dec 19th.  We’d been packing up and putting things away for days.  But no matter how well prepared you are it is no match for the whirlwind that is “’demobilization”.  It starts out slow with the pilot coming onto the boat and guiding us in, and then...

Almost there…!

After being beaten up by the wind and the waves for the last 4 days it has finally laid down out here.  Yesterday really was the worst of the cruise in terms of discomfort. It’s not just how hard the wind blows but where on the ship it’s coming from – we’ve been lucky so...

30 knot winds and 4 to 6 meter seas.

We are heading home—Still.  It is nearly 5 days steam from our last sampling site to the final multibeam survey we have to do. It is still almost a day away. The routine has definitely changed from what we have been living the last nearly 40 days.  Routine is one of the aspects of being...

Making the long run home… but we are not done yet!

Not done yet! We have a date and we can’t be late. One thing that doesn’t change is that every cruise has to have an end point. We have to be in port at 8 am on Dec 19. Before that we have to be at the pilot point pick up at 6 am that...

Our last Jumbo Piston core

We did our final Jumbo Piston Core (JPC) yesterday. In the end it was a success, but the process was rather epic. The corer went over without a hitch (our team is well oiled by now) and the hit on the bottom looked good and the pullout was like butter (just as we had hoped)....

Microbes in the ocean. What do they eat?

Meet Sarah.  No, she’s not a microbe, she’s our resident microbe expert.  Sarah is out with us to look at the microbes that live in the water and try and understand what they eat and how they eat it… Sarah’s work is one of our piggyback projects.  What is a piggyback? That means we had...

There is more than one way to core. Meet the multicore!

In addition to our main mode of coring – piston coring or gravity coring (which has been my main job), we are also taking short cores.  We need these cores because the bigger, longer cores need to hit the mud surface really hard to get a good long core. This means they are so violent...

There is water at the bottom of the ocean. Right?

This cruise is not all mud… For me, this cruise has been all about mud.  Well, almost.  When we wrote the proposal, it was to get mud to look at the past conditions of the Southern Ocean where we are working.  We use the layers of the mud like tree rings to go back in...

The cruise track so far …

Back onshore, John has quickly plotted the voyage track to date and the stations where we’ve stopped for CTDs, cores or multicores (the blue squares on the map). As you can see, we are WAY out there halfway to Africa. If we were to steam straight home now it would take us about 8 days...

There is work to do even on windy days

We’ve been waiting for the wind to die down for almost 2 days… but that doesn’t mean we haven’t been busy. Although we can’t core we can do a lot of other things – like search with our sub-bottom profiler for more locations – which took us back by Ile Amsterdam – where the petrels...